Plant and Flower Care

 

How can I make my flowers last longer?

 

Certain varieties of cut flowers last longer than others. Carnations, for example, can remain vibrant for long periods. Roses have a shorter vase life but are prized for their special and delicate beauty. When buying flowers, be sure to ask your floral professional advice on care and handling. As a general rule, arrangements should last 3 to 5 days, however with proper care, many will last longer. Here are a few handy tips that can help add days to their beauty!

 

 

Essentials for your flowers

 

Keep them in a cool spot (65 to 72 degrees F), away from direct sunlight, heating or cooling vents, direct drafts from a ceiling fan, and the tops of televisions or radiators. (Appliances like televisions give off heat, causing flowers to dehydrate.). Ethylene gas from cigarette smoke, paint fumes, hairspray, exhaust fumes, ripe fruit, and decaying leaves contribute to declining and often make the flower wilt prematurely

IF WILT OCCURS

A wilted flower means the flower is simply not getting water. The stem may be blocked by an air bubble or bacteria, to dislodge the bubble or bacteria follow these steps

To refresh a prematurely wilted flower such as Hydrangea or Roses, RE- CUT the stem on a 45-degree angle with a sharp knife or flower clippers, NOT scissors. Place in water until crisp and hydrated 3-4 hours.

 

  When your flowers arrive in wet foam  

 

Keep the floral foam soaked and saturated in water daily.  

 

  When your flowers are arranged in water  

Keep the vase filled with fresh, clean water. To keep your flowers fresh recut the stems and replace the water regularly.

Remove leaves that will be below the waterline. Leaves in water will promote bacterial growth that can harm the flowers.

Remove faded blooms, arrange remaining stems in a smaller vase if necessary.

 

  When your flowers have woody stems and branches (such as Quince, Forsythia, or Lilac)  

 

Cut the stem with sharp pruning shears a place in freshwater.